How good is the RT-QuIC test for CJD?

Diagnosis of human prion disease using real-time quaking-induced conversion testing of olfactory mucosa and cerebrospinal fluid samples

Bongianni M, Orrù C, Groveman BR, et al.

JAMA Neurol 2016; doi: 10.1001/jamaneurol.2016.4614 (Epub ahead of print).

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To develop an algorithm for accurate and early diagnosis of CJD by using the RT-QuIC assay on CSF samples, OM samples, or both.

METHODS:

In this case-control study, samples of CSF and OM were collected from 86 patients with a clinical diagnosis of probable (n = 51), possible (n = 24), or suspected (n = 11) CJD and 104 negative control samples (54 CSF and 50 OM). The CSF and OM samples were analyzed using conventional RT-QuIC. The CSF samples underwent further testing using improved RT-QuIC conditions. In addition, the diagnostic performance of a novel, easy-to-use, gentle flocked swab for sampling of OM was evaluated. Data were collected from January 1 to June 30, 2015.

RESULTS:

Among the 86 patients (37 men [43%] and 49 women [57%]; mean [SD] age, 65.7 [11.5] years) included for analysis, all 61 patients with sporadic CJD had positive RT-QuIC findings using OM or CSF samples or both for an overall RT-QuIC diagnostic sensitivity of 100% (95% CI, 93%-100%). All patients with a final diagnosis of non-prion disease (71 CSF and 67 OM samples) had negative RT-QuIC findings for 100% specificity (95% CI, 94%-100%). Of 8 symptomatic patients with various mutations causing CJD or Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker syndrome, 6 had positive and 2 had negative RT-QuIC findings for a sensitivity of 75% (95% CI, 36%-96%).

CONCLUSIONS:

A proposed diagnostic algorithm for sporadic CJD combines CSF and olfactory mucosa RT-QuIC testing to provide virtually 100% diagnostic sensitivity and specificity in the clinical phase of the disease.

This reference is included in the neurochecklist:

Sporadic Creutzfeldt Jakob disease (sCJD)

screen-shot-2016-12-24-at-23-32-53

Abstract link

By Bo-Yeong Choi1 , Su Yeon Kim1 , So-Young Seo1 , Seong Soo A An2 , SangYun Kim3 , Sang-Eun Park4 , Seung-Han Lee5 , Yun-Ju Choi5 , Sang-Jin Kim6 , Chi-Kyeong Kim1 , Jun-Sun Park1 and Young-Ran Ju - Mutations at codons 178, 200-129, and 232 contributed to the inherited prion diseases in Korean patients, CC BY 2.0, Link
By Bo-Yeong Choi1 , Su Yeon Kim1 , So-Young Seo1 , Seong Soo A An2 , SangYun Kim3 , Sang-Eun Park4 , Seung-Han Lee5 , Yun-Ju Choi5 , Sang-Jin Kim6 , Chi-Kyeong Kim1 , Jun-Sun Park1 and Young-Ran Ju – Mutations at codons 178, 200-129, and 232 contributed to the inherited prion diseases in Korean patients, CC BY 2.0, Link
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